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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Check out this week’s newsletter for updates on trainings, webinars, events around the country, and our latest blog entry.

Casa de Esperanza Among National Leaders Attending President Obama's Signing of VAWA

(Standing directly to President Obama and Rep. Moore's left is Rosie Hidalgo, Casa de Esperanza's Director of Public Policy.) 

March 7, 2013 marked an important victory for all Americans who seek an end to domestic violence and sexual assault across every corner of our nation. After a hard-fought, and unfortunately long battle, the 113th Congress voted to send the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to the President's desk. Among the honored guests present for the bill's signing was Casa de Esperanza's own Director of Public Policy, Rosie Hidalgo.

Casa de Esperanza has long been at the forefront of the campaign to reauthorize VAWA, seeking to improve and make VAWA more effective for marginalized communities. Working as a Steering Committee member of the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence, Casa de Esperanza collaborated with other national organizations to call for bipartisan leadership on Capitol Hill, mobilize the community, and inform the media and thought leaders on the critical components of a good VAWA bill.

"This victory in securing a bipartisan and inclusive VAWA reauthorization was a result of a large collaborative effort undertaken with a spirit of solidarity to make sure that VAWA was strengthened to protect all victims. It is the result of advocates, survivors, and allies across the country lifting up their voices to urge Congress to do the right thing," said Rosie Hidalgo, Director of Public Policy at Casa de Esperanza.

The end result is a VAWA that includes the improvement of essential remedies for immigrant victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, and the improvement of grant programs targeting enhanced culturally and linguistically specific service for communities of color. In particular, the bill reflects an important commitment to improve protections for Native American victims, immigrants, and LGBT victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The legislation also includes the reauthorization of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA).

The success of this campaign proves that bipartisan support in Congress is possible for issues like violence against women, which should always remain above political divides.

Despite the important action taken by the President, violence against women remains a serious problem in our nation. Casa de Esperanza will continue to passionately support improved prevention and intervention programs for victims of domestic and sexual violence and their families and will continue to advocate for legislation that responds to the needs of victims.

Finally, we also take great pride in sharing with you the recognition bestowed on Casa de Esperanza by the U.S. Department of State when they named Rosie Hidalgo a public representative of the U.S. Delegation attending the 57th Session of the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women. What an incredible experience and honor.

 

Casa de Esperanza Joins the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda in the Fight for Immigration Reform

Washington, D.C. - Casa de Esperanza recently was voted in as an official member of the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda (NHLA), a coalition of preeminent Latin@ organizations in the nation.  Becoming the 34th Latin@ organization in the NHLA, Casa de Esperanza joins the national coalition to help amplify its mission as well as contribute to the coordinated agenda of the national Latin@ community. NHLA members include Latin@ organizations focused on a range of issues, from  business and government to leadership and community development.

"We are excited to join the distinguished list of Latin@ organizations that comprise NHLA membership," said Amy Sanchez, Chief Executive for External Relations at Casa de Esperanza, "Our experience in policy and relationships with Congressional offices can help the NHLA in its efforts to shape public policies on important issues that impact Latin@ communities."

The timing of this membership is critical as NHLA announces the launch of its national immigration campaign, Latinos United for Immigration Reform (www.latinosunited.org). The campaign will feature 60 town halls across the nation and an intensive call to action for the community to contact their members of Congress. The campaign revolves around principles of family unity, due process and pathway to citizenship.

"We welcome Casa de Esperanza to our membership and to the immediate and important task of moving immigration reform legislation through the House and Senate and to the President's desk," explained Hector Sanchez, chair of NHLA.  "We are confident that the work of Casa de Esperanza and its leadership will help expand our reach both into the community as well as on Capitol Hill. We are extremely excited to have them join our ranks."

The partnership with NHLA marks a significant step towards achieving comprehensive immigration reform. Casa de Esperanza has seen that a victim's lack of immigration status can often be used as a tool of abuse and exploitation and can make victims of domestic violence and sexual assault afraid to come forward and seek help. The unification of Latin@ organizations and communities across the nation will undoubtedly create a stronger force to advocate for fair legislation. Casa de Esperanza takes pride in sharing with you its new partnership with NHLA in working towards a more just immigration system and towards advancing other policies that help strengthen families and communities.

Casa de Esperanza is the national Latin@ institute on domestic violence whose mission is to mobilize Latinas and Latin@ communities to end domestic violence. The organization's National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities incorporates training and technical assistance, a public policy initiative in Washington, D.C., and a research center in Atlanta, GA, in an effort to advance effective responses to eliminate violence and promote healthy relationships. Headquartered in St. Paul, MN, Casa de Esperanza also works within communities by providing advocacy, emergency shelter, a 24-hour bilingual crisis line, and opportunities for peer education. For more information, please visit www.casadeesperanza.org and www.nationallatinonetwork.org.

Casa de Esperanza has chosen to use "@" in place of the masculine "o" when referring to people or things that are either gender neutral or both masculine and feminine in make-up. This decision reflects our commitment to gender inclusion and recognizes the important contributions that both men and women make to our communities 

For Immediate Release:


May 15, 2013

Contact:
Brigit Helgen, 202-228-6317

Klobuchar’s Amendment to Immigration Bill to Help Protect Victims of Domestic Violence Clears Senate Committee

Currently, immigrants who are victims of domestic violence are only able to self-petition for independent legal status if they are spouses of U.S. citizens or permanent residents; Klobuchar’s amendment would expand this protection to spouses of those residing in the U.S. under most temporary visa programs as well.

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar’s amendment to the comprehensive immigration reform bill to help protect victims of domestic violence today passed the Senate Judiciary Committee by a unanimous vote. Currently, immigrants who are victims of domestic violence are able to petition for independent legal status under the Violence Against Women Act, but only if they are spouses of U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Klobuchar’s amendment would expand this protection to spouses of those residing in the U.S. under most temporary visa programs as well.

“No one should be forced to remain in an abusive relationship due to fear of losing their legal status,” Klobuchar said. “This is an important step forward for this amendment that will help protect victims and encourage them to come forward and receive the assistance they need.”

“Immigrant women and children entrapped in domestic violence have a human right to safety,” said Rebekah Moses, Program Manager of the Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women. “Abused immigrants in later life have this same basic right. The Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women applauds Senator Klobuchar for championing amendments that protect abused immigrant victims and survivors’ basic human right to safety. We look forward to witnessing these life-saving policies become the law of the land.”

“We applaud Senator Klobuchar for championing these amendments to bring down barriers and create the structures necessary for vulnerable immigrant victims to be able to step forward without fear and have the right and opportunity to seek safety and well-being for themselves and their children,” said Rosie Hidalgo, Director of Public Policy at Casa de Esperanza.

Under current law, victims of abuse can either seek a U Visa, a visa for victims of certain crimes, from law enforcement officials, or self-petition for legal status under the Violence Against Women Act. However, U Visas can be difficult to obtain in some circumstances and victims may fear retaliatory violence from their abusers if they go to law enforcement. Only spouses of U.S. citizens or permanent residents can self-petition for legal status. Klobuchar’s amendment allows victims who are in the U.S. with spouses who entered on temporary visas to take advantage of the self-petitioning process and gain independent legal status.

Klobuchar has long been a supporter of victims of domestic violence. She cosponsored the reauthorization of the bipartisan Violence Against Women Act, and helped lead the effort to pass the bill in Senate. The bill, which was signed into law earlier this year, included a provision similar to bipartisan legislation Klobuchar and former Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) introduced called the Stalkers Act. Their bill would strengthen and update federal anti-stalking laws to better address the new technology predators are using to harass their victims.

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One in three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. We are rising on February 14, 2013, along with people from across the globe, to demand an end to violence against women and girls. Staff members, along with their family and friends, have created a series of videos sharing why they are WALKING OUT, DANCING, RISING UP and DEMANDING an end to this violence. We invite you to rise with us!

 

 

 

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM)   every October. 

DVAM History
Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) evolved from the "Day of Unity" held in October 1981 and conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The intent was to connect advocates across the nation who were working to end violence against women and their children.

The Day of Unity soon became an entire week devoted to a range of activities conducted at the local, state, and national level. The activities conducted were as varied and diverse as the program sponsors but had common themes:

  • Mourning those who have died because of domestic violence
  • Celebrating those who have survived
  • Connecting those who work to end violence

These three themes remain a key focus of DVAM events today. In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. That same year marks the initiation of the first national domestic violence toll-free hotline. In 1989, the U.S. Congress passed Public Law 101-112 designating October of that year as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Such legislation has passed every year since with NCADV providing key leadership in this effort. Each year, the Day of Unity is celebrated the first Monday of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Adapted from the 1996 Domestic Violence Awareness Month Resource Manual of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.


In observance of this year’s DVAM, the National Latin@ Network will be offering a number of training and awareness events that will highlight the work of Latin@ organizations to end violence in our communities. We also joined efforts with other national partners to share our message. We will post this information as it becomes available.  In the meantime, please visit our Training & Events page for information on webinars and training opportunities. 



The following material can be very useful for Domestic Violence Awareness Month. These can all be found on the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence website

DVAM Talking Point Forms: A variety of sample 3-Legged Stool Talking Points Forms that advocates can use when talking to the media. The forms are meant to provide clear, concise and up-to-date statistics and talking points on a particular topic to assist advocates in staying focused on the messages they want to convey to the media. The talking points forms can be found under the "Engaging the Media" tab at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/engaging-the-media.

Campaign Handouts: Easily downloadable "how-to" campaign handouts. These handouts highlight newer awareness activities that have emerged over the past few years and that have seen growing success; the handouts provide guidance so that advocates can join in the efforts and/or replicate these campaigns/events in their own communities. These handouts can be found here: http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/emerging-campaign-events-ideas. Emerging campaign ideas include Cambia el EstatusFlash MobsLight in the WindowNational Call of UnityNational SAF-T Day, and Remember My Name

Speakers' Guides: This guide provides a basic overview of the issues that face survivors who desire to speak publicly about their experiences with intimate partner violence. It provides guidance for both the survivor speaker and victim advocates seeking to maximize the survivor’s physical and emotional safety and ensure the overall success of the speaking engagement. The Guide is organized into two parts: one designed for victim advocates helping to prepare survivors for public speaking and one designed for survivors of domestic violence as they explore the journey of sharing their story with the public. The Guides can be found under “Training Resources” at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/training-resources. These guides have been translated into Arabic and Spanish. 
 
Artwork: The “Artwork” section provides a variety of free sample materials that can be downloaded and customized by advocates/programs. These are especially helpful to programs/advocates who don’t have the resources/capacity to create their own materials. A new addition to this section is our DV101 brochures, which have been recently translated into Spanish. Please click here to access all the artwork: http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/artwork.
 
DV101 Module: A free, DV101 online course, Domestic Violence: Understanding the Basics. This one-hour interactive eLearning module describes the dynamics and common tactics that characterize domestic violence, provides an overview of the scope and impact on individuals and society, explores the underlying factors that allow domestic violence to exist, offers insight into the various risks and choices that survivors face, and shares how to be part of the solution. Divided into 10 sections addressing common questions related to domestic violence, this course will help new advocates, allied professionals, students, and the general public achieve a basic understanding of this complex issue.
 
DVAM Events: A neat and helpful feature of the site that allows advocates to advertise their events at no cost. It also works as a tool for advocates seeking ideas about what other programs are doing in observance of DVAM, in addition to allowing the general public to find events to attend in their communities. Please see “DVAM Events” at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/dvam-events.

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza, celebrate the 2013 Hispanic Heritage Month!

 

The observance of Hispanic Heritage Month began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson. It was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period--September 15 through October 15.

The celebration commences on September 15 because five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, declared their independence from Spanish colonization on this day in 1821. Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and 18 respectively.

2013 Presidential Proclamation

"From the earliest days of our Republic, Hispanic Americans have written crucial chapters in our national story. Hispanics have honorably defended our country in war and built prosperity during times of peace. They run successful businesses, teach our next generation of leaders, and pioneer scientific and technological breakthroughs. This month, America acknowledges these vital contributions and celebrates our Hispanic heritage."

This month, we celebrate this rich heritage and reflect on the invaluable contributions Hispanics have made to America. Read the full proclamation here.

 

 

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observes Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month (TDVAM) in February.

Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month is a national effort to raise awareness about abuse in teen and 20-something relationships and promote programs that prevent it.

The repercussions of teen dating violence are impossible to ignore – they hurt not just the young people victimized but also their families, friends, schools and communities. Throughout February, organizations and individuals nationwide come together to highlight the need to educate young people about dating violence, teach healthy relationship skills and prevent the devastating cycle of abuse.

The scope of the problem:

  • Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.1
  • One in three girls in the US is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.2
  • 1 in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.3
  • One quarter of high school girls have been victims of physical or sexual abuse or date rape.4

Latin@ youth are no exception. Join us as we observe Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month with a number of exciting educational opportunities! Hear from Latin@ youth peer educators directly! Learn about effective strategies to engage youth in talking about healthy relationships and much more!

Listen to Casa de Esperanza's Youth Amig@s, a program that engages Latinas in high school, talk about healthy relationships in a culturally responsive manner.

Register for the webinar, Community Lead Innovative Youth Leaders Program, by Enlace Comunitario, a social justice organization led by Latina immigrants whose mission is to eliminate domestic violence in the Latino immigrant community and promote healthy families in Central New Mexico. This webinar will learn about ways they engage with young people to develop their leadership through peer-to-peer learning promoting healthy relationships to prevent teen dating violence. Wednesday, February 22, 2017; 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. Central Time.

Sources:
1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Physical Dating Violence Among High School Students—United States, 2003,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, May 19, 2006, Vol. 55, No. 19.
2. Davis, Antoinette, MPH. 2008. Interpersonal and Physical Dating Violence among Teens. The National Council on Crime and Delinquency Focus. Available at http://www.nccd-crc.org/nccd/pubs/2008_focus_teen_dating_violence.pdf.
3. Grunbaum JA, Kann L, Kinchen S, et al. 2004. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2003. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 53(SS02); 1-96. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5302a1.htm.
4. Schoen, C. et al., The Commonwealth Fund Survey for the Health of Adolescent Girls, November 1997.
5. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice and Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the United States, 1993-2004. Dec. 2006.

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe the 2013 National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. 

Share Knowledge. Take Action. National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2013.

What is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is an annual, nationwide initiative designed to raise awareness of the increasing impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls. It is organized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women’s Health (OWH). The goal of this day is to encourage people across the country to take action in the fight against HIV/AIDS and raise awareness of its impact on women and girls. To support this goal, this year’s theme is “Share Knowledge. Take Action.”

When is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
This awareness day is observed on March 10, although OWH encourages organizations to hold events in observance of this day at any time throughout the month of March.

Why observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
HIV/AIDS is a serious public health issue in the United States. Women of all ages can get HIV/AIDS, and they account for approximately 24 percent of all HIV diagnoses.1,2 Today, women represent a larger share of new HIV infections than they did earlier in the epidemic, with nearly 280,000 women living with HIV/AIDS in the United States.Women of color are particularly affected, as they accounted for two-thirds (64 percent) of new AIDS diagnoses among women in 2010.3

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped make considerable strides in addressing these concerns and advancing equality for women and girls living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Consistent with the ACA, the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy will help:

  • Increase HIV testing and reduce the number of people who become infected with HIV
  • Improve access to care and optimize health outcomes for people living with HIV
  • Reduce HIV-related health disparities

For more information, visit the ACA page on AIDS.gov: http://go.usa.gov/43vd.

The ACA and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy are two important steps in the fight against HIV/AIDS, but the federal government cannot do it alone. On National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, OWH calls on individuals and organizations across the country to take
action and bring attention to the impact HIV/AIDS has on women and girls. As a partner or collaborator for National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, you have the power to educate others, change behaviors, and help shape the future for women and girls.2

Who should participate in National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
Public and private organizations at the local, state, and national levels are invited to participate.

How can I observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
There are many ways to observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day via inperson events and online events or activities. Hold a town hall meeting, organize an HIV screening event, work with government officials to issue a proclamation, or spread the word through social media about the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls and ways to prevent HIV infection. The possibilities are endless. For more ideas about how to observe this year’s National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, see this list of suggestions for online and community events.

Latin@s are no exception. Join us in a 30 minute conversation with Voces Latinas, an organization that works to reduce the rate of HIV transmission among immigrant Latinas by empowering, educating and promoting leadership and advocacy from within Latin@ communities. Participants will be able to hear the voices of advocates and Promotoras working in their communities. Join us as we observe the 2013 National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

For detailed information please, click here.

For more information about National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2013 and what you can do in your communities please, click here.

One more thing:
Make a Statement: Wear Your Red Shoes on March 8!
Help spread awareness by posting pictures on our Facebook page or tweeting us @casadeesperanza a picture of your favorite pair of red shoes with your message of "I get tested because..." on March 8. Invite your friends to join, post a picture of you sporting your red shoes and blast your social media using the hashtag #NWGHAAD.

 


References

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Monitoring Selected National HIV 
Prevention and Care Objectives by Using HIV Surveillance Data—United States and 6 U.S. 
dependent areas—2010, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 3, Part A
(Atlanta: CDC, 2012),
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2010supp_vol17no3/index.htm.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Estimated HIV incidence in the United 
States, 2007–2010, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Atlanta: CDC, 
2012), http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/#supplemental.
3. CDC, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 3, Part A), 2012.

 

 
 

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe the 2013 Sexual Assault Awareness Month. 

It's time...to talk about it! Talk early, talk often. Prevent Sexual Violence.

The month of April has been designated Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) in the United States. The goal of SAAM is to raise public awareness about sexual violence and to educate communities and individuals on how to prevent sexual violence.

By working together and pooling our resources during the month of April, we can highlight sexual violence as a major public health, human rights and social justice issue and reinforce the need for prevention efforts.

About the 2013 campaign

The 2013 National Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign focuses on healthy sexuality and its connection to child sexual abuse prevention.

This April, join the conversation. Start talking about healthy childhood development to prevent child sexual abuse.

The upcoming SAAM campaign provides tools and information on healthy childhood sexual development that adults can use. By learning about the characteristics of healthy sexuality, adults can better identify risks, support healthy boundaries and challenge negative messages. These tools support parents, community members and organizations as they work to prevent child sexual abuse. 

Latin@s are no exception. Join us for two 30 minute conversations between the National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Casa de Esperanza. We will also hold two webinars that highlight the work of culturally specific organizations. Participants will be able to hear the voices of advocates working in their communities. Join us as we observe the 2013 Sexual Assault Awareness Month!

For detailed information please, click here.

For more information about Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2013 and what you can do in your communities please, click here.

One more thing:
Join us for a Twitter Chat on Tuesday, April 16 at 2pm ET. We will be tweeting as part of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center's (NSVRC) Tweet About It Tuesdays. We will be hosting an hour long live-tweeting session on promoting education and awarenss within Latin@ communities. You can tweet us @casadeesperanza or @NSVRC with your questions and use the following hashtags to join the conversation:
#SAAM
#HealthySexuality
#TweetAboutIt
#TalkEarly
#TalkOften
#prevention

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe the 2013 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD).

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, June 15th

What is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day?

Each year, hundreds of thousands of older persons are abused, neglected, and exploited. In addition, elders throughout the United States lose an estimated $2.6 billion or more annually due to elder financial abuse and exploitation, funds that could have been used to pay for basic needs such as housing, food, and medical care. Unfortunately, no one is immune to abuse, neglect, and exploitation. It occurs in every demographic, and can happen to anyone—a family member, a neighbor, even you. Yet it is estimated that only about one in five of those crimes are ever discovered.

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) was launched on June 15, 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations. The purpose of WEAAD is to provide an opportunity for communities around the world to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older persons by raising awareness of the cultural, social, economic and demographic processes affecting elder abuse and neglect. In addition, WEAAD is in support of the United Nations International Plan of Action acknowledging the significance of elder abuse as a public health and human rights issue. WEAAD serves as a call-to-action for individuals, organizations, and communities to raise awareness about elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

Latin@s are no exception. Join us at Casa de Esperanza and the National Latin@ Network as we observe 2013 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) with a number of exciting educational opportunities! 

For detailed information please, click here.

For more information about 2013 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) and what you can do in your communities please, click here.

Photo Collage Project:
The National Latin@ Network is posting a collage of pictures of staff’s grandmothers as well as team members who are also grandmothers, as a way to honor them while we observe the 2013 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. The collage will appear as part of the rotating banner of images on the National Latino Network for Healthy Families and Communities website homepage during the entire month of June. Check it out!