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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

 

Self-Empowerment of Immigrant Latina Survivors of Domestic Violence: A Promotora Model of Community Leadership

This article presents the results of a self-empowerment leadership intervention program for Latina immigrant survivors of domestic violence in Atlanta, Georgia. It builds on the literature base of the Promotora model, a public health model using peer information sharing as a tool for health promotion. This study used an embedded mixed-methods design with quantitative and qualitative components to evaluate the impact of a peer community leadership program called Líderes. Results of single-subject analyses show that the participants experienced change in three components of self-empowerment: intrapersonal, interactional, and behavioral. The qualitative findings revealed that they overcame fear and gained knowledge as well as a sense that they could promote change in their community. These findings add support to a growing literature base that demonstrates how peer model programs can not only positively influence the well-being of the communities they serve but also have transformative effects on peer leaders themselves. Study findings can also inform future efforts to empower survivors through promotora approaches specifically in the context of domestic violence prevention.

http://hci.sagepub.com/content/14/1/37.abstract


Special Issue of the Latina/o Psychology Today

In this special issue of the Latina/o Psychology Today, a publication of the National Latina/o Psychological Association, you will find two articles written by the NLN research team. On page 12 you can read about the work of the Latin@ youth researchers at Caminar Latino. On page 17 you will find a community capacity framework developed by Casa de Esperanza and the NLN.

http://www.nlpa.ws/assets/final%20lpt%20issue_2_no_1_2015r1.pdf


Realidades Latinas: A National Survey on the Impact of Immigration and Language Access on Latina Survivors

As the immigration debate wages on in the United States, researchers, advocates, community organizers, policy makers, and community members alike have taken note of the direct impact that increased immigration enforcement policies have had on the Latin@ community. This is especially evident in the area of domestic violence (DV), where for the past few years advocates in various states have reported stories of families being negatively impacted by these policies, at times in life-threatening ways. 


Addendum to Realidades Latinas 2015: A National Survey on the Impact of Immigration and Language Access on Latina Survivors


Participatory Action Research with Latin@ Youth: Exploring Immigration and Domestic Violence

Immigrant Latin@ youth affected by domestic violence are in a unique position to provide researchers insight to the needs of their communities. This study engaged youth in participatory action research. Youth at Caminar Latino, a comprehensive, community-based program for Latin@s affected by domestic violence, conducted a study exploring the effects of current immigration laws on Latin@ families in which violence had occurred. We present qualitative narratives by Latin@ adults and youth on how immigration has threatened Latin@ family’s well-being and physical safety.


Research Summary: An Evidence-Based Leadership Intervention for Latina Survivors of Domestic Violence

The Líderes program was created in 2003 in response to Latinas in the Twin Cities of MN asking for leadership opportunities in their communities. In 2006, Casa de Esperanza developed a curriculum for the Líderes and in 2011 it was adopted by Caminar Latino in Atlanta, GA and adapted for women survivors of domestic violence. The Líderes program is a peer model that aims to tap into the abilities of community individuals to share critical information and resources, as well as build community and promote healthy relationships with
other community members. 


Women Who Stay: Perspectives of Latina Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence on Staying With or Leaving Abusive Partners

Many women, regardless of race or ethnicity, choose to continue to live with partners who have been (or continue to be) abusive. Traditional domestic violence intervention approaches have emphasized women leaving abusive relationships, but the applicability and acceptability of this approach for women from culturally diverse backgrounds, including immigrant and Latina survivors of IPV, is not well understood.


For My Mother: Latin@ Youth Letters on Family, Relationships and Violence

The Latin@ Youth Letters study does that, serving as a window into the complex reality of Latin@ youth’s lives. The topics of pride, forgiveness, admiration, and true connection with their mothers are mixed with the realities of racism, violence, fear, and acculturation stress.