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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM)   every October. 

DVAM History
Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) evolved from the "Day of Unity" held in October 1981 and conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The intent was to connect advocates across the nation who were working to end violence against women and their children.

The Day of Unity soon became an entire week devoted to a range of activities conducted at the local, state, and national level. The activities conducted were as varied and diverse as the program sponsors but had common themes:

  • Mourning those who have died because of domestic violence
  • Celebrating those who have survived
  • Connecting those who work to end violence

These three themes remain a key focus of DVAM events today. In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. That same year marks the initiation of the first national domestic violence toll-free hotline. In 1989, the U.S. Congress passed Public Law 101-112 designating October of that year as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Such legislation has passed every year since with NCADV providing key leadership in this effort. Each year, the Day of Unity is celebrated the first Monday of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Adapted from the 1996 Domestic Violence Awareness Month Resource Manual of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.


In observance of this year’s DVAM, the National Latin@ Network will be offering a number of training and awareness events that will highlight the work of Latin@ organizations to end violence in our communities. We also joined efforts with other national partners to share our message. We will post this information as it becomes available.  In the meantime, please visit our Training & Events page for information on webinars and training opportunities. 



The following material can be very useful for Domestic Violence Awareness Month. These can all be found on the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence website

DVAM Talking Point Forms: A variety of sample 3-Legged Stool Talking Points Forms that advocates can use when talking to the media. The forms are meant to provide clear, concise and up-to-date statistics and talking points on a particular topic to assist advocates in staying focused on the messages they want to convey to the media. The talking points forms can be found under the "Engaging the Media" tab at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/engaging-the-media.

Campaign Handouts: Easily downloadable "how-to" campaign handouts. These handouts highlight newer awareness activities that have emerged over the past few years and that have seen growing success; the handouts provide guidance so that advocates can join in the efforts and/or replicate these campaigns/events in their own communities. These handouts can be found here: http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/emerging-campaign-events-ideas. Emerging campaign ideas include Cambia el EstatusFlash MobsLight in the WindowNational Call of UnityNational SAF-T Day, and Remember My Name

Speakers' Guides: This guide provides a basic overview of the issues that face survivors who desire to speak publicly about their experiences with intimate partner violence. It provides guidance for both the survivor speaker and victim advocates seeking to maximize the survivor’s physical and emotional safety and ensure the overall success of the speaking engagement. The Guide is organized into two parts: one designed for victim advocates helping to prepare survivors for public speaking and one designed for survivors of domestic violence as they explore the journey of sharing their story with the public. The Guides can be found under “Training Resources” at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/training-resources. These guides have been translated into Arabic and Spanish. 
 
Artwork: The “Artwork” section provides a variety of free sample materials that can be downloaded and customized by advocates/programs. These are especially helpful to programs/advocates who don’t have the resources/capacity to create their own materials. A new addition to this section is our DV101 brochures, which have been recently translated into Spanish. Please click here to access all the artwork: http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/artwork.
 
DV101 Module: A free, DV101 online course, Domestic Violence: Understanding the Basics. This one-hour interactive eLearning module describes the dynamics and common tactics that characterize domestic violence, provides an overview of the scope and impact on individuals and society, explores the underlying factors that allow domestic violence to exist, offers insight into the various risks and choices that survivors face, and shares how to be part of the solution. Divided into 10 sections addressing common questions related to domestic violence, this course will help new advocates, allied professionals, students, and the general public achieve a basic understanding of this complex issue.
 
DVAM Events: A neat and helpful feature of the site that allows advocates to advertise their events at no cost. It also works as a tool for advocates seeking ideas about what other programs are doing in observance of DVAM, in addition to allowing the general public to find events to attend in their communities. Please see “DVAM Events” at http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/dvam-events.