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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Date: Thursday, December 8, 2016

Time:10:00am-11:30am PT / 11:00am-12:30pm MT / 12:00pm-1:30pm CT / 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

During times when the world around us feels uncertain, our physical and emotional responses that stem from fear can block natural ways that promote inner healing. We recognize that you, as advocates, are an essential resource within the movement to end violence against women and all other forms of oppression. We believe that to be able to continue this work in community, we first must begin taking care of ourselves. We invite you to join this discussion where we will share trauma-informed principles and culturally specific approaches toward a healing and self-care journey. Participants in this webinar will learn to: • Identify physical and emotional responses during times of uncertainty and how to overcome fear • Highlight common cultural values and characteristics that place emphasis on interconnection and community • Discuss practical ways in which to find our personal strengths based on our ancestral teachings, principles, and values

Presenters: Heidi Notario-Smull, Josephine Serrata, PhD., and Micaela Rios - Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network

Register now.

Bios:
Heidi Notario, M.A. serves as the Director of Implementation & Social Change of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities and Casa de Esperanza. Prior to joining Casa’s team, Heidi was the Training Specialist at the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV). She has expertise on issues related to accessibility through her work at the intersections of disabilities and violence against women. She has written a number of resources for survivors’ advocates and provides ongoing training and technical assistance on a variety of violence against women’s issues. Heidi’s interests include a wide array of topics related to the treatment afforded to survivors of violence with disabilities, Deaf survivors, and other traditionally underserved communities by the criminal justice system, service providers, and society at large. She keeps on the forefront of her anti-oppression work the elimination of barriers that impact immigrant survivors and the LGBTQ community. Heidi views “accessibility” from a human rights perspective and is committed to bringing this framework into her work and personal life. Heidi is originally from Cuba and has resided in the U.S. since 1995.

Josephine V. Serrata, Ph.D. is a clinical community psychologist and director of research and evaluation at the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza. Her research and evaluation work are embedded in practices that are culturally affirming and community driven. Her research includes studying the intersections of domestic violence with issues of oppression, privilege and strength in Latin@ families and communities. Her evaluation experiences have included evaluating community based prevention and engagement efforts, including a leadership intervention for immigrant Latina survivors of domestic violence. Her clinical work focuses on trauma informed, culturally relevant approaches. She also serves as the Director of Professional Development for the Latina Researchers Network, which aims to support diverse scholars in academia and advanced research careers. “Josie” is a Latina of mixed heritage (Panamanian and Mexican-American) from San Antonio, TX and proud mother of two boys.

Micaela Ríos serves as Project Coordinator for the National Latin@ Network. She is a deeply-rooted Latina daughter of a 3rd generation migrant mother (whose family comes from Texas) and of a Mexican father from the state of Jalisco. She brings a deep commitment toward racial, economic, and gender equity, and a deep interest in promoting the interest of the Latino community in the movement to end violence. Prior to Casa de Esperanza, Micaela worked for the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence team for over five years in the engagement, planning, and coordination of various funded programs to implement the understanding of the intersectional systemic oppressions, the impact of societal forces on marginalized communities, and importance on centering marginalized voices and histories at the core of all efforts. Her commitment is strengthened through her participation in organizational development, movement building and cross organization collaboration. Micaela works to develop meaningful and effective engagement and connection with the Latin@ community on a local and national level by addressing the differences, embracing diversity, and building cross-cultural understanding to challenge systems that disproportionately affect individuals who are historically marginalized by society.

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