enhancing access for individuals with limited english profiency toolkit

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Alerta de seguridad: si cree que sus actividades en la computadora están siendo monitoreadas, por favor accese este sitio web desde una computadora más segura. Para salir inmediatamente de este sitio, haga clic en la tecla “esc”. Si está corriendo peligro en este momento, llame al 911, a la línea de crisis local, o a la Línea Nacional Directa contra Violencia Doméstica al  1-800-799-7233 o TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Action Alert

VAWA Reauthorization

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was enacted in 1994 as Title IV of H.R.3355, and it has a long history of uniting lawmakers with the common purpose of protecting survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Sign The Action Alert

Current Status of VAWA Reauthorization

Introduced by Senator Leahy (D-VT) and Senator Crapo (R-ID) on November 30, 2011, S.1925 passed on April 26, 2012 on a vote of 68-31.. This bill keeps all existing protections for immigrant victims in place and improves upon them. On April 27, 2012 Representative Sandy Adams (R-FL) introduced the House of Representative’s version of a VAWA reauthorization bill, H.R.4970. On May 16, 2012 H.R. 4970 passed the House by a narrow margin of 222-205.

H.R. 4970 would undermine years of bipartisan progress of advancing protections for immigrant victims. Some of H.R. 4970’s provisions would actually make immigrants more vulnerable and could endanger their lives with provisions that:

  1. Create bureaucratic and burdensome requirements that will weaken protections for victims and delay access to safety under the VAWA self-petition process;
  2. Impose arbitrary and unreasonable barriers for crime victims to apply for a U visa; and
  3. Place victims on a path from report to deport and discourage victims of crime from cooperating with law enforcement by denying access to lawful permanent resident status to many victims, which in many cases could result in separating abused mothers from their American-born children.

Take Action!

Protect these vital protections for victims of violence by signing our action alert.

Contact your legislator and tell them to maintain the immigrant provisions in S.1925.

Click here to learn about Myths and Facts about VAWA Reauthorization (pdf)

Click here to learn about H.R. 4970’s most harmful provisions (pdf)

INCLUDE NEWS ARTICLE OR STORY ON VAWA SUCCESS

Background

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was enacted in 1994 as Title IV of H.R.3355, and it has a long history of uniting lawmakers with the common purpose of protecting survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. Congress has reauthorized the law in 2000 and 2005, each time with broad, bipartisan support and with improvements to better address the needs and improve access to services for victims. Over the years, Congress has consistently recognized the vulnerability of noncitizen victims of violence and has therefore enacted provisions in VAWA that enhance safety for victims and their children and provide important tools for law enforcement to investigate and prosecute crimes.

VAWA has always included special protections for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, recognizing that the abusers of immigrant victims often use their victims’ lack of immigration status as a tool for abuse, leaving the victim afraid to seek services or report the abuse to law enforcement.

Special Protections for Immigrant Survivors in VAWA

In 1994, VAWA “self-petitioning” was created to assist those victims married to U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident abusive spouses, who use their control over the victims’ immigration status as a tool of abuse (either failing to petition for them leaving victims without legal status or threatening to withdraw it).

In 2000, the U visa was created as a law enforcement tool, to encourage victims to come out of the shadows to report crimes to law enforcement and to protect victims who cooperate with law enforcement in the investigation or prosecution of relevant crimes. To be eligible for a U visa, victims must obtain law enforcement certification demonstrating that they have assisted in a criminal investigation or prosecution. Likewise, the T visa was created to help victims of human trafficking and to gain their help in turn with investigations and prosecutions of traffickers.

In 2005, the “International Marriage Broker Regulation Act” was enacted to regulate the “mail-order bride” industry and make changes to the process by which Americans petition to sponsor visas for foreign fiancé(e)s and spouses to protect against abuse and exploitation.

Congress has repeatedly reaffirmed its commitment to these provisions in each reauthorization of VAWA, reflecting bipartisan recognition that domestic violence is a serious crime and public safety issue that cannot be fully addressed if all victims are not safe and all perpetrators are not held accountable.