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VAWA passed the House

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bipartisan bill on April 4, 2019 to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), H.R. 1585. See picture to the right for final count on this bill. (See also Roll Call votes on H.R. 1585)

It is important to reach out to your Senators to let them know that you support H.R. 1585 or a bill significantly similar. Click this link to go to the Senate mini-toolkit prepared by the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence.

If the Senate passes a different version of the Violence Against Women Act, then one of two things will occur: 1) The Senate and House have a conference committee to agree on a revised bill, or 2) The House then votes on the Senate version of the bill.

To find out how to contact your Senators and representatives, please go here.

H.R.1585, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, incorporates many enhancements recommended by the field following extensive outreach to survivors, direct service providers, and other stakeholders. It meets the needs of diverse survivors by:

  • Maintaining vital protections for all survivors and ensuring that none of the enhancements from VAWA 2013 are rolled back, including important remedies for immigrant survivors and the Culturally Specific Services Grant Program (CSSP);
  • Increasing Investments in prevention;
  • Broadening the definition of domestic violence for VAWA grant programs to ensure a more comprehensive approach to working with DV survivors.
  • Ending impunity for non-Native perpetrators of sexual assault, child abuse co-occurring with domestic violence, stalking, sex trafficking, and assaults on tribal law enforcement officers on tribal lands;
  • Improving access to safe housing and economic independence;
  • Protecting victims of dating violence and stalking by restricting convicted abusers from having access to firearms and improving enforcement of court-ordered firearm relinquishment and current VAWA restrictions;
  • Providing law enforcement with resources to develop more trauma-informed approaches;
  • Improving the healthcare system’s and workplace responses to the four crimes;
  • Improving proved protections for survivors in federally subsidized housing;
  • Supporting victims and survivors who need help rebuilding financially after experiencing violence;
  • Addressing the needs of culturally specific and underserved communities;
  • Providing funding for Alternative Justice Responses in various VAWA grant programs; and
  • Other provisions to improve access to services and safety.

Casa de Esperanza is part of the National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence (NTF). The NTF supports a VAWA reauthorization that continues important protections for victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking and makes targeted fixes and modest, yet vital, enhancements. Any bill that erodes current protections is unacceptable. Our recommendations are based on needs identified by direct service providers who work daily with victims and survivors of these four crimes. We will continue to work to obtain bipartisan support for a VAWA reauthorization that meets the needs of victims and survivors and includes the following priorities:

  • Provides increased investments to implement evidence-based prevention programming;
  • Safeguards current protections and resources to ensure that all victims and survivors have access to safety and justice;
  • Improves the mechanism to hold people who perpetrate violence on Native women and children accountable;
  • Provides law enforcement with new resources to develop more trauma-informed approaches;
  • Provides law enforcement with more resources to enforce court orders and prevent intimate partner and law enforcement homicides;

Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) 2019 Reauthorization Efforts

The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) was first passed in 1984 and is administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  FVPSA supports life-saving services throughout the country through grants to states, tribal governments, and territories, as well as to other critical programs, such as national resource centers and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.  It has been reauthorized numerous times, most recently in 2010. 

The last reauthorization of FVPSA expired in 2015 although funds have continued to be appropriated while efforts are underway to reauthorize FVPSA with key enhancements. Enhancements include, increased authorization levels, new funding for Tribal Coalitions, more equitable distribution of resources to the U.S. territories, increased prevention funding, and the development of a new grant program to Enhance Culturally Specific Services for Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations, as well as a new grant program for Reaching and Serving Underserved Populations.

Fact sheets for VAWA 2019

NTF Complete Toolkit on VAWA, with talking points, myths and facts, and more

NTF Sign-on letter to U.S. House of Representatives in support of H.R. 1585

Rebutting Immigration Fraud concerns with VAWA

VAWA FAQs

The Critical Role of VAWA: Services to Victims and their Families

The Critical Role of VAWA: Strengthening the Legal System’s Response

Media Articles about VAWA

Vox: The NRA tried to block an updated Violence Against Women Act in the House — and failed

The Hill: House votes to reauthorize Violence Against Women Act, closing 'boyfriend loophole'

Roll Call: Violence Against Women Act clears House

 

Statement from Majority Leader Steny Hoyer on VAWA passage

Congresswoman Dingell Floor Remarks on the Violence Against Women Act 2019: VIDEO

For Public Comments

NTF public comments USCIS Fraud Tip Form

US Representative Ileana Ros-Lehtinen opening remarks to the No Más Congressional Briefing in Washington, DC.

 

Release of the findings of the “The NO MÁS Study:Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault in the U.S. Latin@ Community,” commissioned by the Avon Foundation for Women for Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network and NO MORE.

The NO MÁS Study Infographic (PDF)

Get the Findings here (in English)

Desubrimientos del estudio No Más 

Sign Template (PDF)

No Mas Study (in English)


Panelists included:

  • Delfina Rojas Ayona, Survivor of domestic violence
  • Juan Carlos Areán, Senior Director of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, Casa de Esperanza
  • Christine Jaworsky, Program Director, Speak Out Against Domestic Violence Avon Foundation for Women
  • Victoria Boston,Vice President, Northeast Area Customer Service, Verizon Wireless
  • Virginia Witt, Director, NO MORE

        

NO MÁS Coverage

Estudio No Más: violencia doméstica en la comunidad latina
Univision
 
Hispanics More Likely to Intervene in Sexual Assault, Study Finds
Philanthropy News Digest
 
WHY LATINOS BELIEVE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GOES UNDER-REPORTED
Hispanic Political Caucus
 
Domestic Violence Targeted by New Campaign That Looks to Empower Women and Men in the Latino Community
Latin Post
 
MSNBC's The Rundown Sheds Light On Unique Barriers The Latino Community Faces In Reporting Sexual Assault And Domestic Violence
Media Matters for America
 
Latino community has own way of dealing with domestic violence, landmark study finds
HispanicTrending.net
 
Fear of Deportation May Be Keeping Latino Victims of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault from Seeking Help
City Watch LA
 
New Study of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault in the U.S. Latin@ Community Reveals Barriers to Reporting and High Willingness to Intervene to Help Survivors
NSVRC
 
NNEDV Joins National Partners in Saying 'NO MAS'
NNEDV
 
 
Bringing Latina domestic violence survivors out of the shadows
MSNBC
 
Report: Latinos Standing Up to Domestic Violence
Women eNews
 
Latina Victims of Domestic Violence Getting More Attention
NBC News
 
Fear of deportation prevents many Latina women from reporting abuse, new survey finds
Fusion 
 
KABC Radio Segment
What Is the Top Barrier Preventing Hispanic Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victims from Seeking Help?
Verizon Wireless
 
Hispanos no denuncian violencia doméstica
Univision
 
Un estudio sobre la violencia doméstica en la comunidad Latina
Univision Despierta America (Live Broadcast)
 
Fear of deportation barrier to reporting abuse?
MSNBC Roadmap  Live
 
Fear Of Deportation May Be Keeping Latino Victims Of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault From Seeking Help
Huff Post Politics
 
Fear of Deportation May Keep Latinas From Reporting Domestic Violence
Cosmopolitan
 
Organizations disclose results of survey on domestic violence and sexual assault among Latinos
HispanicMPR
Media Request: You’re welcome to link to and quote from the article but please don't paste the entire article on a website.
 
New domestic violence study show Latinos ready to get involved & help victims
Latina Lista
 
Fear Of Deportation May Be Keeping Latino Victims Of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault From Seeking Help
Rahaf Online
 
Why Latinos Believe Domestic Violence Goes Under-Reported
ThinkProgress
 
New Study of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault in the U.S. Latin@ Community Reveals Barriers to Reporting and High Willingness to Intervene to Help Survivors (Avon Products Inc)
WN.com
 
Fear Of Deportation May Be Keeping Latino Victims Of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault From Seeking Help
What’s New World?
 
Fear Of Deportation May Be Keeping Latino Victims Of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault From Seeking Help
Wopular
 
FEAR OF DEPORTATION MAY BE KEEPING LATINO VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT FROM SEEKING HELP
Uncova
 
Mujeres hispanas no denuncian violencia doméstica por temor a ser deportadas (VIDEO) 
Telemundo
 
Latino community has own way of dealing with domestic violence, landmark study finds
Fox News Latino 
By Julie Schwieter
 
STUDY SAYS LATINOS RESPOND TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 'THEIR OWN WAY' DUE TO FEAR OF…
Latina
 
 
What You Need To Know About "No Mas", A National Campaign To End Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault In The Latin@ Community
Bustle
 
 
 
 

pre inst ENGL maincover no mas
2018 Latin@ Leadership Pre-Institute 

 

We also want to thank you for your interest in attending this event that was designed for Latin@ Leaders and Aspiring Allies to come together to delve deeper into the issues that impact Latin@ Leaders and Aspiring Allies in the violence against women movement.

We write to you to inform you that the Pre-Institute has been rescheduled to take place at a later date via a series of webinars or virtual training(s). We will follow-up with all registrants with detail updates regarding the Latin@ Leadership Pre-Institute. 

We encourage you all to still join us at the National Latin@ Institute that will take place July 18-20, 2018 in New Orleans. You can register by clicking here.

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact Micaela Rios Anguiano at mrios@casadeesperanza.org.

 

 

 This project was supported by Grant No. 2016-TA-AX-K039 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice.  The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.