enhancing access for individuals with limited english profiency toolkit

Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Language identification cards and posters

Minnesota Department of Health: palm sized I-Speak Cards in 10 languages that enable a person with limited English proficiency to request an interpreter in the language they need.

City of Philadelphia: double-sided flyers (English on one side and one of 19 languages on the other) with detachable “I speak” cards explaining the right of people with limited English proficiency to an interpreter to access city services and how to request one. Use as a template for your program or community.

National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project: I Speak booklet. Persons with limited English proficiency are expected to indicate which of the 72 languages listed they speak.

California Department of Social Services: these I Speak cards in 16 different languages are for persons with limited English proficiency to carry and/or for service providers to place in their files. The double-sided cards (English on one side and one of 16 languages on the other) request language assistance services for the individual and direct the service provider to various federal agencies for more information.

Alaska Court System: I Speak poster with flags/maps added for visual cues. Persons with limited English proficiency are expected to indicate which of the 61 languages listed they speak.

Massachusetts Legal Services: Interpreter services poster that informs the individual they have the right to an interpreter at no cost to them, and instructs them to point to their language and wait while an interpreter is called.

You can make your own version of the above poster:

See the Identifying Spoken Languages Section for additional tools and ideas.

Google Translate: Services like Google Translate should never be used for ongoing language access, as they are often inaccurate and lack translation of meaning and context. However, these services can be helpful in limited circumstances. See the Identifying Spoken Languages section of this toolkit for a more detailed discussion.

Spanish Language or Translated materials

Hot Peach Pages has domestic violence information in 70 languages.

The New York City Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence has domestic violence materials translated in 13 different languages.

OVC - Existe Ayuda Toolkit on Sexual Violence offers material in Spanish.

How to protect yourself and your children from domestic violence: Safety planning for immigrant and refugee women (English and Spanish), by Legal Momentum.

Technology safety plan in Spanish – by NNEDV.

Casa de Esperanza has developed a variety of tools and products in English and Spanish for working with Latin@ families.