Escape

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Skip Navigation

Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families & Communities and Casa de Esperanza observe the 2013 National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. 

Share Knowledge. Take Action. National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2013.

What is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is an annual, nationwide initiative designed to raise awareness of the increasing impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls. It is organized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women’s Health (OWH). The goal of this day is to encourage people across the country to take action in the fight against HIV/AIDS and raise awareness of its impact on women and girls. To support this goal, this year’s theme is “Share Knowledge. Take Action.”

When is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
This awareness day is observed on March 10, although OWH encourages organizations to hold events in observance of this day at any time throughout the month of March.

Why observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
HIV/AIDS is a serious public health issue in the United States. Women of all ages can get HIV/AIDS, and they account for approximately 24 percent of all HIV diagnoses.1,2 Today, women represent a larger share of new HIV infections than they did earlier in the epidemic, with nearly 280,000 women living with HIV/AIDS in the United States.Women of color are particularly affected, as they accounted for two-thirds (64 percent) of new AIDS diagnoses among women in 2010.3

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has helped make considerable strides in addressing these concerns and advancing equality for women and girls living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS in the United States. Consistent with the ACA, the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy will help:

  • Increase HIV testing and reduce the number of people who become infected with HIV
  • Improve access to care and optimize health outcomes for people living with HIV
  • Reduce HIV-related health disparities

For more information, visit the ACA page on AIDS.gov: http://go.usa.gov/43vd.

The ACA and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy are two important steps in the fight against HIV/AIDS, but the federal government cannot do it alone. On National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, OWH calls on individuals and organizations across the country to take
action and bring attention to the impact HIV/AIDS has on women and girls. As a partner or collaborator for National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, you have the power to educate others, change behaviors, and help shape the future for women and girls.2

Who should participate in National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
Public and private organizations at the local, state, and national levels are invited to participate.

How can I observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day?
There are many ways to observe National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day via inperson events and online events or activities. Hold a town hall meeting, organize an HIV screening event, work with government officials to issue a proclamation, or spread the word through social media about the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls and ways to prevent HIV infection. The possibilities are endless. For more ideas about how to observe this year’s National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, see this list of suggestions for online and community events.

Latin@s are no exception. Join us in a 30 minute conversation with Voces Latinas, an organization that works to reduce the rate of HIV transmission among immigrant Latinas by empowering, educating and promoting leadership and advocacy from within Latin@ communities. Participants will be able to hear the voices of advocates and Promotoras working in their communities. Join us as we observe the 2013 National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

For detailed information please, click here.

For more information about National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2013 and what you can do in your communities please, click here.

One more thing:
Make a Statement: Wear Your Red Shoes on March 8!
Help spread awareness by posting pictures on our Facebook page or tweeting us @casadeesperanza a picture of your favorite pair of red shoes with your message of "I get tested because..." on March 8. Invite your friends to join, post a picture of you sporting your red shoes and blast your social media using the hashtag #NWGHAAD.

 


References

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Monitoring Selected National HIV 
Prevention and Care Objectives by Using HIV Surveillance Data—United States and 6 U.S. 
dependent areas—2010, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 3, Part A
(Atlanta: CDC, 2012),
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2010supp_vol17no3/index.htm.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Estimated HIV incidence in the United 
States, 2007–2010, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Atlanta: CDC, 
2012), http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/#supplemental.
3. CDC, HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012, Vol. 17, No. 3, Part A), 2012.