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Safety Alert: If you believe your computer activities are being monitored, please access this site from a safer computer. To immediately exit this site, click the escape button. If you are in immediate danger, contact 911, a local crisis line, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224.

  

 

Rosie talking about VAWA at Captiol

 

 

 

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA for short) was passed into law in 1994 and was created to provide women who experienced domestic violence with resources. Domestic violence shelters, hotlines and technical assistance programs were funded across the country to help lessen and eradicate domestic violence crimes. VAWA has always been a bipartisan effort with both Democrats and Republicans seeking to provide resources for women experiencing domestic violence. With each reauthorization, VAWA has become more comprehensive in order to meet the needs of all individuals experiencing intimate partner violence including immigrants, victims in tribal communities, and the LGBTQ community. Casa de Esperanza stands firmly with VAWA.

Pictured above: The National Latin@ Network's Senior Director of Public Policy, Rosie Hidalgo, advocates for the 2018/19 VAWA re-authorization bill H.R. 1585 in May 2019 in front of the U.S. Capitol Building.